The Bombing War: Europe 1939-1945

Richard Overy in conversation with Robert Gerwarth. The Bombing War is a major new book on one of the most controversial military issue of World War Two by one of Britain’s greatest historians, Richard Overy. It is the first book to examine seriously not just the most well-known parts of the campaign, but the significance of bombing on many other fronts – the German use of bombers on the Eastern Front for example (as well as much newly discovered material on the more familiar ‘Blitz’ on Britain), or the Allied campaigns against Italian cities. The result is a rich, gripping picture of the Second World War and the terrible military, technological and ethical issues at play in the conflict.
Robert Gerwarth is Professor of Modern History and Director of the Centre for War Studies at University College Dublin.
Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 27th September 2013.

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The Dublin Lecture: Daniel O’Connell: The Liberator

Patrick M. Geoghegan in conversation with Ryan Tubridy
Following the winning of Catholic Emancipation in 1829, Daniel O’Connell was recognised as one of the leading figures on the world stage. He was hailed as ‘the defender of Ireland’, the man who had ‘incarnated in himself a people’. Identified as the champion of the weak and the oppressed, he became famous internationally for his opposition to slavery in all its forms. O’Connell was the first democratically elected Lord Mayor of Dublin in 1841. Patrick Geoghegan will discuss the dramatic final years of O’Connell’s life and career, charting his remarkable rise and fall in the 1830s and his political resurrection in the 1840s when he rolled back the years to lead a new national movement, and confirmed his reputation as the man who Gladstone believed was the ‘Moses of Ireland’.
Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 27th September 2013.

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In the Shadow of the Sword: The Battle for Global Empire and the End of the Ancient World

Tom Holland in conversation with Michael Ryan. In the Shadow of the Sword explores how a succession of great empires came to identify themselves with a new and revolutionary understanding of the divine. It is a story vivid with drama, horror and startling achievement, and features many of the most remarkable rulers ever seen. The book is also a dazzlingly colourful journey into the world of late antiquity and every bit as thrilling a narrative history as Holland’s previous works which include the prize-winning Rubicon; the triumph and tragedy of the Roman Republic. Tom Holland has the rare gift of making deep scholarship accessible and exciting. Michael Ryan is a former Director of the Chester Beatty Library.

Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 27th September 2013.

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Birth of a Nation

Ronan Fanning & Charles Townshend in conversation with John Borgonovo. Ronan Fanning’s Fatal Path; British Government and Irish Revolution, 1910-1922 is a magisterial narrative of the most turbulent decade in Anglo-Irish history. It was a time when violence and the threat of violence trumped democratic politics and, argues Fanning, it worked, however much this view offends our contemporary moral sensibilities. Charles Townshend’s The Republic; The Fight for Irish Independence, 1918-1923 dovetails perfectly with Fanning’s book, taking us from the War of Independence through the Civil War and shows how the betrayals and grim compromises put the new nation into a state of trauma for at least a generation. Thus was the new republic born.
John Borgonovo is a history lecturer in University College Cork.

Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 26th September 2013.

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The Great Famine: The visitation of God?

History Ireland Hedge School with Kevin Whelan, Meredith Meagher, William Smyth & Tim Pat Coogan. Chaired by History Ireland editor Tommy Graham
What were the factors that led to the Great Famine of the 1840s? Was catastrophe inevitable? According to Young Irelander John Mitchel, God may have sent the potato blight, but the English created the famine. How does that assertion stand up to recent scholarship? What could have been done, and what was done, to alleviate distress? To what extent were the Irish victims of economic (laissez-faire capitalism) and religious (providentialism) dogmas? This History Ireland Hedge School addresses these key questions.

Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 26th September 2013.

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Britain and Ireland: A Shared Heritage

Roy Hattersley in conversation with Dr John Bowman. In spite of ancient enmities and recent conflict, Anglo-Irish relations have never been better than they are now in the early decades of the twenty-first century. Roy Hattersley served as a deputy leader of the British Labour Party, government minister and shadow minister in a long political career that lasted almost three decades. He has written many books, mainly history and biography, notably David Lloyd George: The Great Outsider. No UK politician is better placed to assess the shared heritage between Britain and Ireland than Roy Hattersley.

Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on 26th September 2013.

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Podcast: Magdalene Laundries – Margaret MacCurtain in conversation with Diarmaid Ferriter

Margaret MacCurtain in conversation with Diarmaid Ferriter
Margaret MacCurtain is a remarkable woman and a rare humanitarian justly renowned as a champion of justice for all, especially for women and children. A lecturer in the Irish History Department of University College Dublin from 1964-94, she has also held prestigious posts in US colleges in Boston and Baltimore. Her research into the history of Irish women won her the award of the Eire Society of Boston Gold Medal in 1993. As a distinguished member of a religious order and a distinguished historian she is uniquely qualified to discourse on the history of the Magdalene Laundries.
Diarmaid Ferriter is Professor of Modern Irish History at University College Dublin.

Recorded at Dublin Castle, Printworks venue on September 26th 2013.

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