Category: Podcasts 2016

The Cultural Revolution 1962-1976

Frank Dikotter (c) Wilco van DijenFrank Dikötter in conversation with Isabella Jackson
After the economic disaster of the Great Leap Forward, Chairman Mao launched an ambitious scheme to shore up his reputation and eliminate his enemies. The stated goal of the Cultural Revolution was to purge China of bourgeois, capitalist elements by subjecting them to public humiliation, imprisonment and torture. This third volume in Frank Dikötter’s ground-breaking ‘People’s Trilogy’ is a devastating reassessment of the history of the People’s Republic of China.

Frank Dikötter is a Dutch historian and the author of ten books that have changed the way historians view modern China. He has been Chair Professor of Humanities at the University of Hong Kong since 2006.
Dr Isabella Jackson is Assistant Professor in Chinese History at Trinity College Dublin.
Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 24 September 2016.

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The Devils’ Alliance: Hitler’s pact with Stalin, 1939-1941

Roger Moorhouse Roger Moorhouse in conversation with Robert Gerwarth.
For nearly two years the two most infamous dictators in history actively collaborated with one another. The Nazi-Soviet Pact stunned the world. WWII was launched under its auspices and its eventual collapse led to the war’s defining and deciding clash. In The Devils’ Alliance Roger Moorhouse tells the full story for the first time, from the motivation for its inception to its dramatic end in 1941 as Germany declared war against its former parter.

Roger Moorhouse is an English historian and the author of three critically-acclaimed books: Killing Hitler; Berlin at War; and most recently The Devils’ Alliance, a fascinating study of the Nazi-Soviet Pact.
Robert Gerwarth is Professor of Modern History at UCD and Director of its Centre for War Studies. He is the author of The Bismarck Myth and Hitler’s Hangman: the Life of Heydrich.

Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 24 September 2016.

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Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raid on Entebbe Airport

Saul DavidSaul David in conversation with Keelin Shanley

On 3rd July 1976, Israeli Special Forces carried out a daring raid to free more than a hundred Israeli, French and US hostages held by German and Palestinian terrorists at Entebbe Airport, Uganda. The legacy of this mission is still felt today in the way Western governments respond to terrorist blackmail. Now, with the mission largely forgotton or even unknown to many, Saul David gives the first comprehensive account of Operation Thunderbolt.

Saul David is Professor of Military History at the University of Buckingham. He is the author of many books on military history and is a regular contributor to programmes on British radio and television.
Keelin Shanley is a journalist and presenter on RTÉ radio and television.

Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 24 September 2016.

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The Vanquished: Why the First World War failed to end, 1917-1923

Robert GerwarthRobert Gerwath in conversation with Anthony McElligott.
For the Western allies 11th November 1918 signified the end of fighting which had destroyed a generation. It also vindicated the terrible sacrifices made in the defeat of the German, Austro-Hungarian and Ottoman Empires. But for much of the rest of Europe the end of World War 1 ushered in a nightmarish series of conflicts. In this gripping book, Robert Gerwarth asks us to think again about the true legacy of WW1.
Robert Gerwarth is Professor of Modern History at UCD and Director of its Centre for War Studies. He is the author of The Bismarck Myth and Hitler’s Hangman: the Life of Heydrich.
Anthony McElligott is Professor of History and Head of Department at the University of Limerick.

Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 24 September 2016.

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Commemorating 1916: Looking Back

G.P.O.Panel with Martina Devlin, Diarmaid Ferriter, Patsy McGarry, Ronan McGreevy, Margaret O’Callaghan and moderator Sarah Carey.
Despite the many dire warnings of the risks involved in the 1916 commemorations, the general consensus confirmed that Ireland had not only conducted them with dignity and gravitas but had also succeeded in igniting a public mood of pride and confidence as people streamed onto the streets to remember Ireland’s journey towards self-determination. How can we sustain the positive tone in future commemorations? Will Civil War politics provoke division and old enmities? A panel of distinguished experts examines the key issues.
Martina Devlin is a novelist and columnist for the Irish Independent. Diarmaid Ferriter is Professor of Modern Irish History at UCD. Patsy McGarry is Religious Affairs correspondent with The Irish Times. Ronan McGreevy is a news reporter with The Irish Times. He is the editor of Was it for This? Reflections on the Easter Rising. Margaret O’Callaghan is a senior lecturer at Queen’s University, Belfast School of History. Sarah Carey is a columnist and broadcaster.

Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 23 September 2016.

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Foreign Games and the Foundation of the GAA

Paul RousePaul Rouse in conversation with Joe Molloy.
Paul Rouse’s landmark Sport and Ireland was the first history of sport in this country, locating it within Irish political, social, and cultural history, and within the global history of sport. It demonstrated that there are unique aspects of Ireland’s sporting history which are defined by the peculiarities of life on a small island on the edge of Europe. Equally, the Irish sporting world is unique only in part; much of the history of Irish sport is a shared history with that of other societies.

Paul Rouse is a lecturer in the School of History at UCD. His main research interest lies in Irish social and cultural history of the 19th and 20th Centuries, particularly the history of sport, and the GAA

Joe Molloy is a presenter on Newstalk 106-108’s Off the Ball and a sports columnist at the Irish Independent.

Recorded at Printworks, Dublin Castle on 23 September 2016.

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